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How to Handle Sexual Harassment in the Workplace as an Employee

Posted by:

Ann Cascanett

Since every situation and person is different, you should act in a manner that makes you feel the most comfortable, supported, and safe.

If you believe you are being sexually harassed, you should always consult your employee handbook or policy and follow the procedure.  You should also put your complaint in writing and take notes on the details of the harassment.  The details should include information such as the date, time, and place of the incident.  Your notes should also include any witnesses and what was said and/or done during the incident. If the harassment was via a digital format, you should save a digital copy as well as a physical copy, if possible.

If you feel comfortable and safe confronting your harasser you should:

  1. Explain what behavior you feel is harassment, but be specific.
  2. Tell the harasser that the attention you are receiving and/or that their behavior is bothering you and making you uncomfortable.
  3. Then ask him/her/them to stop.
  4. You should also make a detailed note of this contact.
  5. Even though you have attempted to deal with this matter directly, you should still tell a supervisor, manager, human resource personnel, or another coworker of the steps you have taken in addition to the issue for your complaint.
  6. You can also contact an EEOC or MCAD counselor to discuss your rights even if you do not wish to file a complaint.
  7. You should continue to do a good job at work and keep copies of any reviews, evaluations, notes, memos or emails indicating you are doing a good job.

 

If you do not feel comfortable or safe confronting your harasser you should:

  1. Report it to a designated person as indicated in your employee handbook or policy. You should also tell a co-worker.
  2. Make a detailed note of your reporting the complaint.
  3. You can also contact an EEOC or MCAD counselor to discuss your rights even if you do not wish to file a complaint.
  4. Should you wish to file a formal complaint as a result of the harassment you have 180 days (approx. 6 months) to file with the EEOC or 300 days to file with the MCAD.
  5. Don’t be afraid to seek support from family and friends as this is a difficult situation to deal with.
  6. Continue to do a good job at work and keep copies of any reviews, evaluations, notes, memos or emails indicating you are doing a good job.

 

If you are being harassed at work and believe your rights have been violated you should consult an employment and/or civil rights lawyer.  The state and federal agencies that handle discrimination (the MCAD and the EEOC) also contain valuable information on their websites.  For a consultation regarding your right to be free from harassment contact us at info@cascanettlaw.com.

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